Thoroughness and tenacity may help when applying for SSD benefits

Social Security disability benefits for injury and illness are important benefits for many people. Social Security disability benefits for illness and injury can be an important resource for those without an income due to illness or injury. The need for Social Security disability benefits has increased in past years, however, the number of approved applications has decreased. In fact, two-thirds of applications for SSD benefits are rejected. It is important to keep in mind that a denial can be appealed.

Those involved in reviewing applications for SSD benefits report feeling pressure to approve applications and some administrative law judges have been noted to approve ninety percent of applications. To qualify for SSD benefits, the illness must be expected to last a year, the applicant must suffer an inability to work as the applicant did before or adjust to another job because of the illness. When reviewing the application, the specific medical history of the applicant, and severity of the disability, will be considered. Analysis of ability to work will also be conducted.

Unfortunately, simple technical errors can sometimes result in an application being denied. Technical errors that may cause an application to be denied can include providing inaccurate or insufficient information or omitting information that is required. Providing thorough medical and work records may help. Some tenacity may also be required to achieve a favorable outcome when applying for SSD benefits. Some types of illnesses may also enjoy expedited processing if the illness falls into certain categories of specified illnesses defined by the Social Security Administration.

Becoming disabled, and the accompanying financial insecurity, may be a significant challenge for any party to face. With knowledge and understanding of the application process, qualifying for SSD benefits for illness is a process than can end in a positive outcome.

Source: The Motley Fool, “Social Security Disability: Why Do So Many Americans Get Denied?” Dan Caplinger, Sept. 6, 2014