Sufferers of PTSD have options for financial support

Post-traumatic stress disorder is a devastating illness that affects millions of people in the U.S. People who suffer from PTSD can experience a wide range of symptoms that can make it all but impossible for a person to do the things they used to prior to developing the condition, including work.

Getting treatment and support is crucial for people who have been diagnosed with PTSD. This includes not only physical, emotional and psychological support, but also financial support as well. PTSD can be much more complicated than people realize, so having the time and resources to devote to recovery can be critical.

People who suffer from PTSD have typically gone through a very traumatic experience that leaves them vulnerable to certain conditions. For instance, this illness is often diagnosed in people who have served in the military, lost a loved one unexpectedly, gotten involved in a serious accident or been the victim of abuse.

The trauma of these types of incidences can leave a devastating impression on a person. Within months, many people start experiencing extremely disruptive symptoms including:

  • Racing thoughts
  • Inability to sleep
  • Depression
  • Flashbacks
  • Memory loss
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Mood swings and uncontrollable emotional outbursts
  • Extreme levels of anxiety
  • Chronic fear

Because of how intrusive these and other symptoms can be, sufferers of PTSD often withdraw and cannot engage in daily activities. Treatment for these conditions can be crucial to help a person regain a sense of normalcy, but it can be too difficult to focus on treatment if financial concerns are holding a person back.

In order to have the time and energy to devote to getting help for PTSD, it can be wise to understand and take advantage of the financial support that may be available to people who suffer from a disabling illness. This could include Social Security disability benefits, Supplemental Security Income and veterans’ benefits.

With the help of an attorney, it can be possible to pursue these benefits so that a person can focus on dealing with and treating their illness.

Source: Mayo Clinic, “Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD),” accessed on May 12, 2015