Rejection rates may discourage Social Security benefit seekers

There are different types of Social Security benefits for different circumstances and it is important for Tennessee residents to understand both the differences and similarities when pursuing a claim.

According to reports, one man with AIDS had his application for Supplemental Security Income denied twice. Many others also struggle to receive much-needed income and benefits from Social Security Disability claims. The elderly, those who are homeless and those with disabilities may all struggle to receive Social Security benefits.

Nationally, only twenty percent of those who apply for Supplemental Security Income or Supplemental Security Disability are approved. The high rejection rate of claims may deter some potential applicants. One expert noted that applicants are frequently struggling with physical pain.

Denied SSI claims can be a serious stumbling block for many individuals who are already struggling. Because of this, it is important to have a thorough understanding of the claims’ process in order to ensure the best outcome possible.

Social Security offers a variety of different benefits. Supplemental Security Income benefits are offered to indigent citizens, as well as those that are suffering with blindness or are disabled. SSI benefits are for those who do not qualify for Social Security Disability Benefits because of work history. This can be an important source of benefits for disabled individuals, as well as others in a variety of circumstances who are facing different struggles.

Social Security Disability benefits are based on payments made into the program through payroll deduction and as such they are dependent on work history. Medical determinations and criteria for both SSI and Social Security Disability Insurance are essentially the same. However, the applicant will have to meet certain income requirements that are not required when applying for Social Security Disability Insurance.

Source: Times Herald, “Homeless, disabled struggle to receive social security income,” Irma Widjojo, June 21, 2014