Disabled veterans: Take advantage of legal resources available

When you or a loved one is suffering from a disabling physical or mental condition, it can be difficult to ask for help at first. Dealing with a serious condition can require considerable adjustments and challenges to your daily life, and many people would rather try and figure things out themselves.

At a certain point, however, it becomes clear and unavoidable that a support system and resources can make things much easier. People in this situation may not hesitate that much when it comes to seeking medical support, but it can also be crucial to reach out for legal guidance.

Working with an attorney can help you get a strong understanding of what options you have for seeking benefits. For many veterans experiencing a disabling condition, money is tight and it can be difficult to care for yourself and your family without a steady income. This is why it can be crucial to understand that you may be eligible for veterans benefits as well as Social Security disability benefits.

While it is not necessary to have legal representation when pursuing these benefits, there are several reasons it can be a good decision. To begin with, both Social Security and the Department of Veterans Affairs are massive government agencies that have been overwhelmed by applicants. This means it can be difficult to get the answers and attention you may need to file a successful claim.

There are a number of reasons your claim for benefits could be denied, from typos to a failure to provide evidence that your condition is disabling. Without a second pair of eyes to review applications, mistakes can be made that lead to a denied claim.

Lastly, attorneys, including those at our firm, have the experience in pursuing claims that many veterans do not. Vets are typically navigating the system for the first time and don’t know what to expect or how to avoid potential obstacles.

For these and many other reasons, it can be a wise decision to consult an attorney at our law offices if you or a loved one are dealing with a disabling condition and don’t want to also deal with the complex and frustrating process of seeking the benefits you may critically need.